About Beijing





About Beijing

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Beijing Attractions


The Great Wall of China starts beyond Jiayuguan in China’s northwest, passing over deserts and grasslands, going along mountain ridges, and finally ends in Hushan in Liaoning Province on China’s east coast. It has a length of over 6,000 kilometers. Especially famous is the wall built 220–206 BCE by Qin Shi Huang, the first Emperor of China. Little of that wall remains. Since then, the Great Wall has on and off been rebuilt, maintained, and enhanced; the majority of the existing wall is from the Ming Dynasty. The most popular sections of the Great Wall of China are around Beijing’s north and east.
The Forbidden City was the former imperial palace which was the home to twenty-four Chinese emperors over 491 years between 1420 and 1911. The Forbidden City is now known as the Palace Museum and is open to Beijing's visitors. The well-guarded palace is surrounded by a moat 3,800 metres long and 52 metres wide. Intruders were discouraged by guards in watchtowers with bow and arrows. As well as walking through the wide open courtyards along its central axis, the sides offer some museum exhibits and small courtyards worth exploring.
Tiananmen Square is located at the center of Beijing City and the midpoint of Chang'an Avenue, named after the Tiananmen gate (Gate of Heavenly Peace) located to its North, separating it from the Forbidden City. It is the largest city square in the world, occupying an area of 440,000 square meters (about 109 acres), and able to accommodate 1,000,000 people at one time. The square contains the Tiananmen Tower, Monument to the People's Heroes, Great Hall of the People, Chairman Mao Zedong Memorial Hall.
Temple of Heaven is China's largest and most representative existing masterpiece among China’s ancient sacrificial buildings. It covers 2,700,000 square meters (667 acres), which is nearly four times the area of the Forbidden City. The temple was constructed in 1420 during the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644), and was enlarged during the Qing Dynasty (1644-1911). Emperors of the two dynasties used to worship the heaven and pray for rich harvests, as the feudal emperors thought they were the son of the heaven.
Summer Palace is a vast ensemble of lakes, gardens and palaces in the northwest of Beijing. Being the largest and most well-preserved royal park in China, it greatly influences Chinese horticulture and landscape with its famous natural views and cultural interests, which also has long been recognized as 'The Museum of Royal Gardens'. The construction started in 1750 as a luxurious royal garden for royal families to rest and entertain. It later became the main residence of royal members in the end of the Qing Dynasty. In 1924, it was open to the public.
National Stadium known as Bird's Nest, is situated in Olympic Green Village, Chaoyang District. It was designed as the main stadium of 2008 Beijing Olympic Games. The Olympic events of track and field, football, gavelock, weight throw and discus were held there. Since October, 2008, after the Olympics ended, it has been opened as a tourist attraction. Now, it's the center of international or domestic sports competition and recreation activities. In 2022, the opening and closing ceremonies of another important sport event, Winter Olympic Games will be held here.
More attractions can be found in http://www.travelchinaguide.com/cityguides/beijing.htm